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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. bernanke said it. a lot of people said it. and then i said it after you said it. >> i know it. and you're on optimist. >> i am an optimist. >> in terms of why i thought it was contained was, first of all, i was talking about subprime and we made the mistake of just simply saying the subprime was not big in relation to a 13, $14 trillion u.s. economy. and what was really going on is we were talking about housing overall and since world war ii, housing, residential home prices, had generally gone up. and the mortgages were just considered to be very safe investments. and so the kind of decline we saw was something that was not envisioned in any kind of model. it wasn't anything that many people that were close it to -- after the fact, it seems obvious to all of us. but the -- and so when you had the kind of decline we saw in housing prices that changed the behavior of those of homeowners, and, also, the other thing you and i were talking about before the show is this -- all of this complexity. so when -- it. >> it's crazy. mortgage-backed securities that were rated triple-a by a bunch of
up at a senate hearing today with fed chairman ben bernanke. >> we have a situation in which major financial institutions are amplifying a public crisis for what would appear to be for private gain. i want to ask you here whether or not you think there ought to be limits on the use of credit default swaps to prevent the intentional creation of runs against governments. do you have any quick comments on that? >> using these instruments in a way that intentionally destabilizes a company or a country is... is counterproductive, and i'm sure the sec will be looking into that. we'll certainly be evaluating what we can learn from the activities of the holding companies that we supervise here in the u.s. and joining me with the latest on all this is roben farzhad, senior writer for "bloomberg business week" magazine. in general terms first, what exactly is chairman bernanke promising to look into? >> this has for the better part of the decade been the great big unknown, this world of derivatives which are largely unregulated secondary investment vehicles. they're almost train of thought.
, you have three big concerns. bernanke's confirmation, slowing china growth and obama slapping the banks around in the aftermath of the massachusetts miracle. i think investors have really focused upon those things and have used those skuexcuses to t profit. >> you don't seem to think things are over. we're due for a pullback and maybe the bull market continues? >> you look at fourth quarter earnings right now and i guess we're about halfway through the season. two-thirds of the company have beaten on revenues. you have consensus earnings for s&p that have now moved up to $76 a share. that puts multiple of a 14 times forward earnings. you have core inflation below 2% year over year. 3.6% treasury yield. multiples are too low. you'll see more corporate earnings improvements and stocks will go higher. >> massachusetts miracle? massachusetts disaster maybe. massachusetts tragedy maybe. >> depends on your point of view. >> i guess it does. i want to get that other side in. >> why are you looking at me? phil is the guest. >> i'm sorry. >> jay, what do you think of that scenario? thi
had hey, ben bernanke, tim geithner and sheila bair at head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and business and government. i cannot think of four people who would have done a better job to get us through that. it is fashionable to look back and look at one little aspect of what was happening our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you were at a party i was at september 2008 when the talk of what are the money market funds save? when you have 3.5 trillion of funds held by 30 million people who on a sunday night worry about whether they can get their money, that was half of all deposits. you have a panic. you have commercial paper frees up entirely and some of the biggest companies in the united states that are described, worried if they would be payrolls in a short period of time. the six largest bank in the country with domestic deposits washington mutual and the third largest bank, wachovia, needed of shock on a monday morning to survive. most interesting, but this book starts and early september when freddie mac and fannie mae essential
economic appointees, brank bren bernan bernanke, who was the chairman of economic advisers under bush, and henry paulson, a very decent guy, came to us, the democratic and republican leadership and said, we need to do this bill. otherwise you go back a step. on the tuesday of that week, mr. bernanke and mr. paulson came to us and informed us, didn't ask us, that they had decided to provide money to aig. that was a bush administration unilateral decision. they then came back two days later and said, would you vote on $700 billion? we said, well, here's what we'll do. because you've announced that the world will collapse if we don't do it. and i think they were right that there was terrible trouble. but when the two top presidential appointees come to tell you, if you don't do this publicly, there'll be a collapse, then there'll be a collapse, because confidence is so important. so we were the ones who insisted on putting some pay controls on there. you're going to have ken feinberg on later. we also said, no, you can't do the $700 billion all at once, you've got to do it in sections. i
room that we were very fortunate as a country to have in place. we had hank. we have ben bernanke. we have tim geithner, and we had sheila bair, the head of the fdic. and i know a lot people in finance. i know a lot of people in business. i know a lot of people in government. and i can't think of four that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable now to look back and pick out one little aspect or another of what was happening then, but our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008 when the talk was, are our money market funds safe? now, when you have 3.5 or more trillion of funds held by 30 million people, who on a sunday night are worrying about whether they can get their money, that money was half of all the deposits held by u.s. banks at the time. you have a panic. you had commercial paper freeze up entirely, and you had some of the biggest companies in the united states, and some of them are described in this book, to worry about whether they're going t
in place. we had hank, ben bernanke tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and a lot of people in business and government. and i can't think of for that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable to look back and pick at one aspect or another of what was happening and our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008, one to talk was the money market funds saved. if we have 3.5 trillion fun missile by 30 million people who on is and they might are worrying about whether they can get their money that was half of all the process held by u.s. banks at the time you have a panic. you had commercial paper frees up entirely in the biggest companies of the united states and some are described in this book that worried whether they were going to meet their payroll and a short period of time to read the sixth largest bank in the country in terms of the domestic deposits, washington mutual failed over a weekend. you had the th
. people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke gave us the largest downturn since the great depression. that is why we have a huge budget deficit. we didn't have a huge tax cuts. we had stimulus and response to the downturn. we have higher unemployment if we have not had that but let's be clear if we are upset about the deficit greenspan and bernanke, i don't know why we reappointed bernanke. in terms of the entitlement programs, yeah we have a public pension program, which is hugely popular. you look at polling day that-- i was at a conference this morning in social security is over 90%. they ask people would you be willing to pay higher taxes to sustain sosa security benefits and 70 to 80% said yes. i don't see any problem with running a pension program through the public sector. what is the problem with the? it is usually popular. health care costs, medicare again. we are providing medicare health care benefits for seniors. that is also hugely popular. you have these tea party people out there yelling don't let the government touch medicare. they are anti-government but they want me
. musberger. >> that's where the sum is mitt will be taking place. for the second time today ben bernanke will come face to face with lawmakers who want his exit strategy from the drastic measures the fed took to keep the economy going. >> steve, what can you tell us about not annual what the fed chair said, but did he give a hint on where interest rates are headed? >> he did. he said what are considered on wall street, chuck, the magic words that the fed will remain exceptionally low for an extended period. that phrase has guided wall street's forecast for where the fed will be. it basically means the fed will not change policy for six months. you sat there, read the testimony. as soon as he said those words you knew they were safe. so the idea is the fed leading up to this had done some mechanical things that some in the market mistook for the beginning of tightening, but they were just what the fed called normalization. so the fed chairman needed to say that and he said it. what i think is because banking and regulatory reform is alive in the senate, if not the house -- remember, they
we talk about where bin bernanke and i told congress we're going to need these authorities, and the difficulty we had at that time was as more and said better than i could. the arteries of the financial system were freezing up, and so i knew with certainty that business was going to turn down because when you have companies it is uncertain whether they will appeal to raise short-term funding. most of the cfo's are going to go to the ceo and say i may not be able to have all of the funding he would like for the next 30 days so what does a prudent company do? they start cutting back but the congress had an seen this yet so they hadn't seen it in their district so i knew with certainty it was going to get worse. i'm not sure i knew it was calling to be 10% on an employment but i knew we was going to be bad. so then, and i knew if they didn't do something in the collapsed, then the businesses wouldn't be able to find themselves, wouldn't be able to pay for the inventories and pay the supply years and would let employees the and the would ripple through the economy and we would
's promise to end no bid contracts. >> bret: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke says he is keeping his eye on goldm mman satches and other firms make -- goldman sachs and other firms that are looking line creasingly they might default on debt. the recent bad weather may have short-term but not long-term impact on unemployment. the jobless claims shoot up by 22 thousand last week. it didn't set well on wall street. orders to u.s. factories for big ticket items shot up in january by 3%. most of that were for commercial aircraft. we told you of incidents where the obama administration has given no-bid contract with firms to ties to democrat. tonight in fox include exclusive, correspondent james rosen has a similar account on what could be life and death in post-9/11 era. >> from the terror of the anthrax attacks born an initiative president bush called project bioshield. >> the budget will have $6 million to make available effective vaccine and treatment. >> since then, handful of biodefense firms using lobbyists and the competitive bidding conferentract had huge awards. the department of hea
bernanke back for round two, and stephanie elam back. another rally today? >> sorry, kyra, i don't think we will get a repeat one. >> that was a sarcastic, laugh. hell no, kyra. >> yeah, pretty much. we will not see the same picture. but bernanke will deliver the same testimony today but this time before the senate banking committee. yesterday, investors were happy to hear they were going to keep key interest rates for a while longer. they raised the discount rate on what they charge to banks, and if that happened it could slow the recovery and it's a precarious time for the economy. investors jumped up and cheered ben bernanke after he said he was staying the course. and then the debt problems in greece may be getting worse. as i was saying, we are looking for triple digit losses out the gate. and that's what we have. the dow off 137 points. and so no, as i was saying, no, not another rally, at least not to start. >> gosh, okay. shut me down. thank you, steph. definitive. there we go. let's move on. >>> hummer goes the way of pontiac, and stud baker. the deal to sell the brand to a chinese
for banks in the country. host: ben bernanke referred yesterday to short-term political liability for this. guest: i think he is absolutely correct. people tend, under these kinds of conditions, to one to blame someone. the problem with that is there are plenty of people to blame. we deregulated the industry. the congress deregulated the industry. there was a culture, if you will, of deregulation. and this encouraged some of what i call speculative activities that led to the bubbles and then the collapse. yes, you had this reaction. i think it is an overreaction, and the outcome would be -- as you try to blame someone you get worse outcomes rather than better outcomes, and i think that is what the chairman was trying to communicate. host: does the banking committee and the members, are they right to be angry at the fete at all? guest: if they're going to be angry, i think they have to be angry at everyone, including themselves. they allow these organizations to get bigger and more risk oriented. and yes, and regulatory agencies because of this culture -- the regulatory agencies because of
bernanke. t.a.r.p. was supposed to be used to counter the mortgage crisis, not to bail out the big banks. do you believe mccain was misled? >> no, i don't, monica. the night before on nbc nightly news, you may remember john yang had a record that feerchbd john mccain saying because of his experience, he was best equipped to rhett republic arizona. now, in western inventory knack ewe lar, this ain't john's first rodeo. when he suspended his campaign to go back to washington to sit face-to-face with those decisionmakers, now a couple years later, he's telling us he was misled? i have to tell you, this is isn't revision of history. that sounds more like john kerry in 2004 than the john mccain i used to work with. >> and the mccain camp is attacking your spending record. they have a radio ad saying you talk like a conservative, but you spend like a liberal. they're citing your vote for the bridge to nowhere. you supported the 2003 medicare prescription drug benefit. what do you think of those ads? what do you think of those allegations? >> well, first of all, with all due respect, i understa
to come back into a government position and i know ben bernanke and hank paulson are well-known for this. could you talk a little bit about that in any ideas on how that could be stopped through laws or voter action or anything? >> i'm glad you reminded me about the revolving door. i see this happening. i see my friends do this. they dress like me when they are working on capitol hill and i see them two years later and they have really nice suits with a french cuff and offer to buy lunch. the left the capitol to up working for congress and a lobbying firm hired them because they knew that when the friend then calls his old underling on capitol hill to say hey i just want to talk to you about the farm bill, that his old boss or his old bosses colleagues are going to take the call and that is the revolving door. barack obama's said literally, i'm going to stop the revolving door. is white house chief of staff, rahm emanuel-- there is not, as the word for rahm emanuel because welby was working on the campaign is a chief fund-raiser he was getting paid by goldman sachs as a consultant at the
that of course was going to burst, and this is why i get mad at people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke and most economists because god knows what on earth was going through their heads in the year 2003 to those of four cardinals five, 2006, to dozens of as the bubble could growing and growing and the savitt is okay and now they are surprised who could have known that is the joke we have or not washington they run around saying who could have known? anyone doing their job should have known. >> host: amity shlaes, anything you want to address? >> guest: i think it's important of the interplay and the war and domestic policy because when you have -- it's true the government can't think about two things at once. it can't walk and chew gum at the same time and when you have a distraction whether you believe it's something we should invest in, afghanistan, iraq or not the government doesn't think well what is going on at home so if he would have called on our various leaders at the fed or the white house over time under -- in this purpose it would be under president bush postsecondary 11th h
. your dreams. more within reach. meet us at ameriprise.com. >>> ben bernanke. >> yes. >> who oversaw the collapse of not only the united states, but pretty much the entire world financial system. >> right. >> and brought our economy to its knees has been reappointed as head of the fed. >> right. >> does this give you hope for being re-elected governor of new york? because may i remind you, he screwed everybody. >> wow. >> eliot spitzer taking shots from colbert last night. here with us now, founder, editor of thedailybeast.com, tina brown. >> good morning, everyone. >> great to see you. we'll get to your explosive piece about andrew young. have you quite a bit to say about john edwards' body man. we may have to bleep that. but first, maureen dowd's don't ask, don't tell op-ed. she writes in part -- tinea it was a pretty remarkable day on capitol hill. >> i thought it was pretty believing. very moving indeed. one does ask whether it will ignite a cultural war thing and distract. that's the only thing that scares me, we do need to be focused on jobs now. the timing seems strange. but h
as a country to have in place, hank, ben bernanke kumbaya tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people and finance and business and government. i cannot think of for that would have done a better job. but to look back of our country's financial system throes of during that period. some of you were in a party i was that in 2008 when the talk, when you have 3.5 four more trillion held by 30 million people on a sunday night are worried about whether they can get their money, that money was half of all deposits held in the banks at that time. you have a panic. you have commercial paper frees up entirely and some of the biggest companies described in the book worried if they would be payable in a short period of time. the sixth largest bank in the country with the maastricht staged domestic deposits and the third largest bank, wachovia, i needed a shotgun marriage on a monday morning and it just arrived this. interestingly the bookstores early september when fannie mae and freddie mac worry essentially bart -- broke. the two institutions guaranteed 40 percent of all res
get so mad at people like ben bernanke. most economists, god knows what on earth was going through their heads as they watch the bubble keep grow and grow and grow and said everything was okay. now they are surprised fukuda agnone? that is a joke we have around washington. anyone who is doing their job should have known. >> host: amity shlaes anything there you want to address? >> guest: i think it is important to think about the interplay between the war in domestic policy because it is true the government can think about two things at once. it cannot walk and chew gum at the same time and when you have a distraction, whether you believe it is something we should invest then, afghanistan, iraq, the government does not think well about what is going on at home so if you called on our various leaders that the fed or at the white house over time under, in this period under president bush,'s september 11 you would say are you concerned about fannie mae? they would say absolutely, here's the data and they are going out of control, fannie and freddie and we will be have legislation abou
decades. he made money too cheap. a lot of people want to put bernanke on mt. rushmore because he's making money cheap and guiding us through this crisis. >> it does raise us to this issue. rates were so low under alan greenspan was part of the problem and then we had this giant bubble and the bubble burst. instead of letting the bubble go back to flat we've been huffing and puffing by printing more money and trying to help everybody and make it easier to try to keep it inflated a little bit. it has so many holes in it will go down here at some point. >> you're right. all right. international superstar erin burnett. how many points exactly is the market going to go up m. >> i hate this. >> we'll see if it turns around by the end of the day. we'll have a lower open. i'll make it up. up plus 30. >> wrong. up 72. erin burnett, thank you. >> have a good weekend, guys. >> that's all i got. thank you for being with us, erin. that $100 that you have, it's worth about $72 now. >> mika stole it back. typical democrat taking your money. >> she's liberal. all right. coming up, new overnight developme
bernanke who was named by bush the federal reserve chairman, henry paulson, the treasury secretary. they said if they didn't do this bailout, the abyss would've happened and it wouldn't have been a recession, it would have been a depression. >> well, you know, a lot of people did offer that chicken little scenario. and equally other economists and people in the real banking world, for example, a communication i received from the president of bb & t asking the 435 members of the house and the 100 members of the senate not to vote in favor of the bailout because the money would not end up being used by banks to be loaned to consumers and you would have banks under the thumb of greater government control. and, indeed, though i don't like to use hank bolson as a source, he made it very clear that while mccain in the end supported it, when john suspended his campaign to go back to washington, and voters thought he's going to make a stand for us. john, instead of being the tell it like it is straight talk express guy, he meekly read a couple of talking points and went ahead with the whol
market overseas are down in anticipation of fed chairman ben bernanke's testimony. that will happen in congress and will happen today. he's talking where the economy is going and what's going to happen to interest rates. it comes a day after the consumer confidence index dropped 10 points. i'm competent this segment will with gretchen. >> freedom of speech is live and well in america's universities, we know that, right? unless you're saying something that the students don't like. check out recently happened at u.c. irvine when the israeli ambassador to the u.s., michael orrin tried to deliver a speech he was invited to make. >> it's a source of frustration the person who spent much of his life speaking hebrew. >> not -- >> haven't come to this campus to hear one idea. you've come to hear a multiplicity of ideas. >> guilty of 100 -- >> you, sir are responsible for genocide. >> ok. fox news contributor tucker carlson is joining us this morning from washington. good morning to you, tucker. >> good morning. >> that's disgraceful. they invite this guy to the university to speak and c
today. >>> meantime, making headlines in the business world, fed chief ben bernanke back on capitol hill telling the senate committee that the central bank is looking into whether u.s. you banks worsened greece's debt crisis. some u.s. banks are said to use complicated currency swap to help greece understate the debt problems betting thalt country would default on its debt. coming up tomorrow, friday on wall street, we'll get key reports, consumer sentiment, existing home sales, also a revised reading on fourth quarter gdp, the final day of the trading week. >>> a lot of questions today about why a killer whale at seaworld turned on its trainer. next jane velez-mitchell host of "issues" will give her take on this tragic incident. don't go anywhere. >>> 40-year-old dawn brancheau was one of the most experienced trainers at orlando seaworld. her death is a shock to her co-workers and park visitors who saw this happen yesterday. a killer whale named tilikum dragged her under water at the end of a performance in the shamu stadium. audience members said, at first it just seemed like it was pa
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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